Leslie Langnau's Blog – August 2012 Archive (4)

Constructing a Cubesat using additive manufacturing

The use of Windform® XT and additive manufacturing (AM)/3D printing (3DP) technology demonstrates the fast adaptability and freedom of design possible in nearly any field. For the developers of the RAMPART Cube Sat, the use of this material and technology enabled them to modify, change, and add experiments without concern for having to develop tooling or modify an existing cube structure.

By Franco Cevolini, CEO, CRP Technology S.r.l; Walter Holemans, Planetary Systems Corporation;…

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Added by Leslie Langnau on August 23, 2012 at 11:21am — No Comments

Making sense of the 3D printing, additive manufacturing industry

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In this constantly shifting industry, it can be a challenge to keep up with all the changes and developments of who is offering what in the way of 3D printing and additive manufacturing. Tuan Tranpham, Referral Channel Manager at Objet Inc., has…

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Added by Leslie Langnau on August 15, 2012 at 8:38am — No Comments

More 3D printing options in metals

Several European 3D printing/Additive manufacturing companies are establishing offices here in the U.S. One of them is SLM Solutions, which develops and sells laser sintered metal machines, competing with EOS, 3D Systems, and now Renishaw.

In 2012, SLM Solutions established an office in Commerce, Michigan. Reasons for doing so include the increasing demand for technical consulting services as…

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Added by Leslie Langnau on August 14, 2012 at 5:24am — No Comments

3D printed "Magic Arms"

Check out this very heart warming story about the use of 3D printing and robotic principles to help a young girl overcome the limitations of disease. http://www.stratasys.com/Resources/Case-Studies/Medical-FDM-Technology-Case-Studies/Nemours.aspx

Added by Leslie Langnau on August 1, 2012 at 8:25am — No Comments

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