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National Instruments Mechatronic Resources

Robotic Table Football: Revolutionising Mechatronics Education Using myRIO and LabVIEW

Although Mechatronic design is a key part of our MEng Mechanical Engineering degree programme, students often struggle to realise their designs using traditional textual programming languages, due to unintuitive ...

Robotic Table Football: Revolutionising Mechatronics Education Using myRIO and LabVIEW

Although Mechatronic design is a key part of our MEng Mechanical Engineering degree programme, students often struggle to realise their designs using traditional textual programming languages, due to unintuitive ...

Robotic Table Football: Revolutionising Mechatronics Education Using myRIO and LabVIEW

Although Mechatronic design is a key part of our MEng Mechanical Engineering degree programme, students often struggle to realise their designs using traditional textual programming languages, due to unintuitive ...

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Comment by ilian_l@yahoo.com on December 19, 2010 at 11:25am

I haven't instal 2011 yet, but i still have problem with some bugs in hole wesart that still remain from previous version.

Sevijayakumar see attached for drawing template sample. There is a lot of way of improoving the templates depent of what you are you looking for..SolidWorks%20MET%20Templates.pdf

Comment by vijayakumar on November 19, 2010 at 7:53am
Hi Everybudy,

I want creat new drawing templet in solidworks please suggest me how to creat templet in better way.If possible send me the sample of the templet.
Comment by Bill Redd on November 18, 2010 at 1:30pm
I agree, BUT if he dimensions the holes, they wil still be odd size. A callout to a PEM Part Reference to Spec Sheet instead will solve that problem. The conversion BACK to inches still will display some machining ambiguity, but a 2 or 3 place GDT tolerence would at least make it doable... ( is that a word? I've had gaps since my stroke ) The good news is that any error will be divided by 2.54~ making that error wirthin most acceptable tolerance allowances. I agree with designing in METRIC. Just be careful if there are mating reciprocating fits.
Comment by Ev Van Wert on November 18, 2010 at 1:22pm
Bill, you are correct, However as Jay stated "I have to design prototypes in standard, but I have to convert my designs to metric to be manufactured." He should design in straight metric and change units to inch for proto's. This will allow him to test the final metric design via the prototype. PCBA clearance holes will work for either. Mounting with sheetmetal (by gage) and pems. he could just change the PEM callout from inch to metric.
Comment by Bill Redd on November 18, 2010 at 1:01pm
( Danged arthritis ) [ THESE ]
I was a machinist, and tool-maker in my younger years. Shops that I deal with TRULY appreciate my design skills. I design parts exactly as they must be formed by machines ... and extrusions exactly as they are formed, I learned to forge at age 8, so as well I design forgings exactly as they would be formed as well. These are the skills lacking in most young engineers... I learned from the bottom up. EVERY engineer should at least spend a couple years in a machine shop to learn HOW parts are actually made, and appreciate what un-attainable tolerances and/or conversiona do to his designs. I SPENT MY time in purgatory ... how about the rest of you?
Bill Redd
Comment by Bill Redd on November 18, 2010 at 12:54pm
No you didn't miss anything, that option is fine for odd number conversion, make an English designed part to English dimensioning size on Metric equipment. Experience tells me to design it in the proper measuring system to eliminate ambiguous trailing decimal places and machining errors, along with the metric drill size holes not agreeing with the English sizes. I do not convert, I work in the unit of measure desired in the final product.
. I've run accross hundreds of people that attempt to convert between systems, and gripe about the system they are most unfamiliar with. I've seen tooling errors created by thewse conversions. Designing for the target is the most efficient. Kind of like multi-linguistics. THINK in the language you are currently SPEAKING. It's much simpler and far more accurate.
Comment by Ev Van Wert on November 18, 2010 at 12:38pm
So am I missing something here? Why not to into tools / options and toggle the units back and forth. Draw it once and have the best of both worlds.
Comment by Bill Redd on November 18, 2010 at 12:19pm
Sorry 'bout that Jay. Dang beancounters, if they actually totaled the beans up, they would see the savings on the bottom line. I've performed jobs for more than 50 organizations in 30 or more years. More than half are no longer around due to activities such as that. Hope that doesn't sound like the "Kiss of Death" with Old Bill, It's just that I have out lasted most of them. ( I've never been known to make "bean counters" happy )
Bill Redd
Comment by Jay Shangraw on November 18, 2010 at 9:49am
Thanks for the reply Bill. In a perfect world, it would be so much easier to be in all metric. But the company I work for is far from perfect. We use standard for in house design, but anything done overseas must be done in metric. My problem is that we have very limited metric hardware to build prototypes. So I have no choice but to design in standard and make the conversion for production.
Comment by Bill Redd on November 18, 2010 at 8:19am
OOps..sorry for the blank
Hi Jay, here is one, http://www.onlineconversion.com/

but I have a question, why waste time working in English units tro start with. I'm 62 and began working in metric units as a ham radio enthusiast, and electronics / communications in the 1960's. Are they still teaching English units? It's a waste of both design and build time when you already know the resulting project is to be in International units. Metric is so much easier, and much of it is simply decimal shift for scaling purposes. Much of the Conceptual Prototype can then be used for the Proto/Test Production unit, saving both time and component purchase.
Bill Redd
 

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