Most would ask, do you do have PM program, do you stick to it? But I am more curious about if Electrical PM is included in your PM program, and do you stick to it.

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I have the Maintenance Techs check and record the Amps per leg on all of the Equipment Motors.  They do this Quarterly on all of the Presses, Conveyors, Vacuum Pump/Motors, Fans, etc.  Comparision between Quarters shows me if a Motor is starting to break down.  All three legs should be about the same amps.  I then have time to order and receive in a replacement before it shuts down the plant.  Semi-Annually I have a survey done using Infrared Temp Guns to see hot spots in the Electrical Panels and wiring.  These hot spots are usually loose connections which can be corrected before they try to weld together.  This time taken saves a lot of money later in new items and downtime. 

Hats off to you Kevin. That covers the bulk of it. (Because most electromechanical issues, as they become extreme increase heat and/or current. Making up for lack of vibration analysis.:>) I am curious, do they do panel inspections while there? (IE: panel vent, terminal screws, battery and force light on PLC, visual, etc.)


Kevin D. Dawson said:

I have the Maintenance Techs check and record the Amps per leg on all of the Equipment Motors.  They do this Quarterly on all of the Presses, Conveyors, Vacuum Pump/Motors, Fans, etc.  Comparision between Quarters shows me if a Motor is starting to break down.  All three legs should be about the same amps.  I then have time to order and receive in a replacement before it shuts down the plant.  Semi-Annually I have a survey done using Infrared Temp Guns to see hot spots in the Electrical Panels and wiring.  These hot spots are usually loose connections which can be corrected before they try to weld together.  This time taken saves a lot of money later in new items and downtime. 
Yes, they are covered as well.  I also check amps and voltage at the legs coming into Disconnects and Control Panels.  Then I don't have heart attacks when one leg is totally out of proportion from the others, I'll know beforehand that the problem is in the incoming voltage.  But I think mainly on the motor/pump and control panel level for the most part because of the vibration, dust, and material that get in them.  I also have them check the standard bolts, such as the bolts and nuts holding the machine together. (But that is a different subject)  If they are going to crawl all over the machine checking the components for the PM, I want them to check it all.  If they can fix it then, I expect them to.  If not, I expect them to fill out a Work Order on it.  I keep the Work Orders lumped together by machine, this way if a machine is not scheduled to run production today, then, fix the problems listed on the Work Orders.  This saves from having to schedule overtime or weekends on Production Machines to do what could have been done during the week.
Perfect. I hope yours and your team's dedication turns out to be the rule, not the exception to the rule. But I fear it is the other way around. That most do not see the importance and profitability, like you do, to have the dedication like you guys do. :>)

Kevin D. Dawson said:
Yes, they are covered as well.  I also check amps and voltage at the legs coming into Disconnects and Control Panels.  Then I don't have heart attacks when one leg is totally out of proportion from the others, I'll know beforehand that the problem is in the incoming voltage.  But I think mainly on the motor/pump and control panel level for the most part because of the vibration, dust, and material that get in them.  I also have them check the standard bolts, such as the bolts and nuts holding the machine together. (But that is a different subject)  If they are going to crawl all over the machine checking the components for the PM, I want them to check it all.  If they can fix it then, I expect them to.  If not, I expect them to fill out a Work Order on it.  I keep the Work Orders lumped together by machine, this way if a machine is not scheduled to run production today, then, fix the problems listed on the Work Orders.  This saves from having to schedule overtime or weekends on Production Machines to do what could have been done during the week.

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