What is the best engineering field to enter, that has a good job potential in the next 5 years to come, and pays well?

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The Power Industry is recession proof. So Electrical is the way to be!
I'm a Mech. Eng., so I'm partial to that. I find it to be the most 'general' engineering discipline, as it's heavily focused on energy (thermodynamics, heat transfer, etc.) Like it or not, the energy-related industry is growing.
I believe that Software/ Computer Engineering is always a great choice because of the constant demand for newer and faster hardware/software for everyday computerized objects.
Plumbing engineering is wide open. Finding good plumbing designers is almost impossible. Most mechanical engineers do not want to design plumbing. You do not need a degree to be a plumbing designer. Experience is everything. It is a position that is very hard to fill these days. So, if you are a plumbing/piping systems designer, you can just about write your own ticket.
Plumbing eh? That is a good idea! I would do it. Just throw enough money at me.
yea, plumbing isnt really a high paying job, im looking to go into a field that i'll enjoy and pays really well. As we all know, as much as you may love your job, money does come into play when the economy takes a toll on your pay. I am looking to go into aerospace and i hear this it the toughest degree to persue, has anybody heard the same?
Honestly, I think that it depends on the degree. If you are a Mechanical Engineer, then Mechanical Engineering is the "hardest". No, but really I think that the difficulty of a degree, or more specifically the difficulty of a specific course in a degree (difficult courses are what makes up difficult degrees) depends on how you learn, the content taught and the method for teaching it. That said, there is definately a lot of abstract concepts that could be hard to visualize for many people in Aeronautics. So I am sure in any case if you are looking for a "challenge", it would fit the bill. However, I would look at Mechanical Engineering. It is general enough to where you can go into Aeronautics type applications if you want, but you could also go a million other directions. And diversity is synonymous with job stability.


Case and point, just recently I was offered a good position with Hill Airforce Base for an Aeronautical Engineer position. Among other things what the job would have entailed would be design of ejection systems for many different types of military jets along with propulsion type applications for rockets. Pretty interesting stuff if you ask me. And that is just one example.
sergio said:
yea, plumbing isnt really a high paying job, im looking to go into a field that i'll enjoy and pays really well. As we all know, as much as you may love your job, money does come into play when the economy takes a toll on your pay. I am looking to go into aerospace and i hear this it the toughest degree to persue, has anybody heard the same?
sergio said:
yea, plumbing isnt really a high paying job, im looking to go into a field that i'll enjoy and pays really well. As we all know, as much as you may love your job, money does come into play when the economy takes a toll on your pay. I am looking to go into aerospace and i hear this it the toughest degree to persue, has anybody heard the same?

Personally, I think Chemical Engineering would be the toughest. But that's probably because I suck at chemistry.
Mechanical engineering specializing in fluids and thermodynamics or Chemical engineering working in Thermodynamics and gas separations etc. These are both great in the new areas of energy alternatives etc. which WILL be the in demand and highest paying areas for the next 100 years+.
My company needs mechanical engineers and I find that it is harder and harder to find recent graduates with this degree. I am sure that as the supply of MEs continues to decrease in this country the wages will probably go up.
Wow- seems to be really short on civil and environmental engineers in here. I'd recommend environmental engineering. That's what I've been doing for the past 14 years, I've always been busy (usually too busy), and my company is always looking for more. Plus, so much of what we do for industrial and municipal clients is driven by state and federal regulations that are always becoming increasingly strict, so there is always work out there, and pretty recession-proof.

The money isn't bad, either, by the time you get 4-5 years of experience, and your PE (a necessity in this field). And as regards the degree of difficulty, for me, doing this is a lot easier than doing what I studied in college (structural/geotechnical engineering). And certainly easier (again, for me) than chemical, mechanical, nuclear or aerospace.
if you are good it does not matter.

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