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Motion Control

Motion Control Group

Website: http://www.motioncontroltips.com
Members: 178
Latest Activity: Feb 20

National Instruments Mechatronic Resources

Preparing Our Undergrads for Ambitious Engineering System Design Through Mechatronics

Overview: Skill levels: All Presented by Dr. Tom Lee, CEO, Quanser and Adjunct Professor of Systems Design Engineering, University of Waterloo Most engineering schools have introduced some form ...

Transforming Labs to Accelerate Student Understanding of the Core Concepts in Mechatronics

Overview: Skill levels: All Presented by Dr. David MacNair, Director of Laboratory Development, Georgia Tech Laboratory experiments are a mainstay of undergraduate engineering education. In an ...

Robotics Online Seminar

Join this two-part webinar series to explore how the NI LabVIEW graphical programming language makes it easy to program complex robotics applications by providing a high level of abstraction for sensor ...

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Comment by Donald Fitchett on May 9, 2013 at 5:32am

Which of these two PLC vs PAC & PC vs PLC videos do you like the the best? (Please vote thumbs up on the one you like best.)

Feel free to share with buddies too. :)

Or do you like this one best ...

 

Comment by Daniel.Lou on May 9, 2013 at 1:16am

Hi,this is Daniel,i am a engineer professional in prototyping and
tooling in China.Hope we could learn more each other in here and also
hope have an opportunity to work with you.

www.jevny.com
www.jevny.wordpress.com (Prototype and Tooling life in Shenzhen)

Comment by Donald Fitchett on July 6, 2011 at 8:05pm
By the way, I was successful at networking all those process automation controllers via wifi. It was cool. If anyone needs details how I did it, just ask.
Comment by Lance Brown on March 23, 2011 at 8:49am

Hey a Webinar was just posted here on the EX that I thought peeps in this group might be interested in:

 

Webinar: Putting the 'Green' In Motion Control

 

Comment by Lance Brown on November 18, 2010 at 12:57pm
In case anyone hasn't noticed, DesignWorld is hosting a live webinar: Motion and Vision Convergence, Tuesday, December 14, 2010 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM PST. You can register and learn more here
Comment by james zhang on March 12, 2010 at 8:13am
To James Jones:

I know a couple of companies in the micro-machining area that have already been adopting micro linear motor for their applications. In addition, do you consider peizo-electrical stages for this type of applications?
Comment by Donald Fitchett on March 3, 2010 at 6:25am
Have a project comming up where I need to set up 4 laptops to connect to 1 Allen Bradley controlLogix via wifi and a linksys wireless router. If anyone has any advice, tip, links to instructions that may help wirelessly connecting all classroom laptops to a PLC (ControlLogix PAC actualy:>), let me know. Thanks
Comment by lees on December 3, 2009 at 8:47pm
Capacitive sensors give very high performance. Unfortunately, they require a driver system and generally some tuning. Optical reflective sensors can require a bit of dong to make work well for a gear, but they are very cheap, come in a number of packages/voltages/logic rules, and do very well if they are able to be kept clean. Some models can discriminate distance surprisingly well, and this means even smaller teeth can work.
Comment by James Jones on November 6, 2009 at 4:33am
To state my objective more plainly: does anyone in this community have an opinion as to the difficulty or feasability of designing a linear motor that can be built using a coil winder and a small, light CNC mill? TIA, James
Comment by lees on October 22, 2009 at 2:03pm
An often overlooked encoder for some low to moderate speed applications is the optical mouse chip. It can work with performance similar to a 1024 cpi linear encoder, can provide feedback for multiple axes (the output is a vector rather than a simple quadrature or count/speed), and is relatively easy to implement. Surface characteristics are important but can be very flexible. They tend to get contaminated in dusty environments. They also have trouble with cumulative accuracy and require an independent home system of some sort. It can only handle several inches per second well. But the shortcomings can often be addressed for a variety of applications. A $3 to $7 chip with built-in serial capabilities that accomplishes what a lot of encoder strips, packaging, and software development would normally do is an attractive option.
 

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