Please comment on how you would like Engineering Exchange to serve its community (for engineers, by engineers).

Tags: Community, Engineering, Information, etc

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A place to exchange technical information and hints on problem solving that would be easily searchable.

IMO
I would like Engineering Exchange to server the engineering community as a valued added information resource. I can't help but see how much waste is created in companies by engineers solving the same problems over and over.

For example, I'm working on sizing ceramic bearings. Calculating the bearing loads and associated life for this class of bearing is not trivial. Gathering the information is tedious and time consuming. Over time I've become the internal expert on this type of bearing and the associated design. However, I can't help but think of all the other engineers in the world that will go through same time consuming process in the future. Therefore, I would like to post the methods, formulas, and information acquired during the ceramic bearing design task on this site.

If others were to do the same, Engineering Exchange would become a valued added repository for specialized engineering tasks and an online knowledge base.
...However, I can't help but think of all the other engineers in the world that will go through same time consuming process in the future. Therefore, I would like to post the methods, formulas, and information acquired during the ceramic bearing design task on this site.

If others were to do the same, Engineering Exchange would become a valued added repository for specialized engineering tasks and an online knowledge base.

Great comments Dion – to further that, over the weekend, I spoke with a young controls engineer at an aerospace company who was struggling with a Matlab / Simulink issue in his job. He could not find resources he needed on a Real Time Workshop issue, and pressed the issue of needing resources from a peer group, and then would be inclined to share in an environment like this. I hope to see him at the Exchange, and as an admin of the site we're here to listen to you and everyone to make this a success.

Thanks again and welcome!

Marshall
I'm hoping it can serve as a way for newer, less experienced Engineers to find some advice from the more experienced Engineers on carreer-related matters: How to make oneself more valuable to the employer, and how to develop the skills that are in demand do employer changes can be smoother.

When I was earning my EET degree, I had teachers advise me to seek out a senior Engineer at my first job and make him/her my Mentor, so that I could learn the 'hands-on' and 'life lesson' skills that could not be taught in school.

Now as an Automation Engineer for a smallish molding company, I have no mentors available. The only other Engineer, a Design Engineer, is kept so busy on his projects that I barely have time to talk to him, despite our sharing an office. A conversation with a headhunter showed that I was lacking in 'hands-on' experience with Allen-Bradley PLCs, despite my firm grounding in digital control systems, and there is no opportunity to get the training at the plant, since the Omron PLCs in use are programmed and maintained by the Maintenance department, and they jealously guard the access to the software.

With two years in the position, I find myself still classified as an 'entry-level' candidate by the headhunters, competing with the fresh graduates in any career moves. It is also next to impossible to develop skills in this environment, since all projects I propose are assigned a budget of $0 until I 'prove' that I need the specific equipment I requested. (A vision system project jas been stalled for three months while i 'prove' that I need an LED backlight. I've already 'proven' that a flashlight and a 'trouble light' do not work, and now I am tasked to find 'more options' to 'prove' that all possible options have been exhausted. The LED backlight only costs $325, when the company does not even bat an eyelash at purchasing a $3,000 conveyor belt.
"When I was earning my EET degree, I had teachers advise me to seek out a senior Engineer at my first job and make him/her my Mentor, so that I could learn the 'hands-on' and 'life lesson' skills that could not be taught in school."

I couldn't agree more. This site should assist in mentoring less experienced engineers. I had a professor during college that asked me, "What did you learn and what would you change on that suspension design?" I responded with "I learned how I would improve the design, knowing what I know now about the problem." To this he responded, "You just summed up the trajectory of your career in one answer. Prepare to spend your career learning what you would have done differently if you had a better understanding of the problem and technology at the outset (hindsight), more time, and more money."

This may sound like a "glass is half full" view of engineering, but I feel it recognizing a basic problem. As an engineer I wanted to solve this problem. So when mentoring young engineer I explain what was learned and what could be improved functionally, without reference to a specific solution. When being mentored I ask for a full disclosure of what was learned and what could be improved, without specifying a specific solution. By doing this, I believe that every design I touch is improving the overall functional performance of a product, which leave me feeling great at the end of each day!
I would like to see Engineering Exchange become a major source for companies to expand their client base.
The Engineering Exchange should be like a Global Institution where professionals can share thier knowledge, experience and Contribute to the Global Community. Such knowledge and experience should be easily available to engineering community and the people who need it. The Engineering Exchange can be place for global discussions on new research through seminar, conferences and workshops among the engineering community and people of Institutions/Universities Interested in this Community.

Prof. D.K.Maharaj, Director-Principal, Asian Institute of Management & Technology, Dhaurang, Yamuna Nagar, Haryana,India 4-2-2009
I see Engineering Exchange as a portal for information sharing and knowledge transfer to keep technology always on the move.

There was a period when I was learning the software CoCreate from Parametric technologies the makers of Pro-E. After working a lot with paremetric modeling it was difficult initially to go to a non-parametric modeling tool. So I had to really drill down google and PTC to actually get some good tutorials to train myself on the software. It took me about a month to work on it, but now I am pretty good at it.

With time on hand now I have learnt how to utilize Solid Edge, Solidworks, Pro-Engineer & Inventor. And being in the Engineering field there is always opportunities out there that require an extra hand. With Engineering exchange, I think this extra hand will be well spent posting various tips & tricks, formulaes, methods and aquired information. It is a good information resource to reduce learning curves now and in the future. Learning curve not limited to CAD, but also to design and manufacturing of products in current industrial segments.

As a new member to engineering exchange, I look forward to having a lot of good interactions.

Best Regards and All the best to Engineering Exchange

Ashok Guru
I remember a sentence that say 'engineerin to be enjoy' so what the engineering word means
it means ingenuity so we should have ingenuity to solve our problems who has this feature is a real engineer
but how we should get this skill?
in this place we can discuss about some cases that never can solve by person
i love all of you that try to be a good engineer
forum for technical discussion and exchange of knowledge and opinions on user initiated challenges

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